Luxury Wedding Cakes Cornwall and Devon: Having a Wedding Cake at an Outdoor Wedding.

It’s early April 2020 and we are all on lock-down/self-isolation. But it’s a glorious day outside, which got me thinking about having a wedding cake at an outdoor wedding.

 

In the UK you can’t, as things stand currently, have a fully outdoor wedding. There must be some kind of permanent structure, with a roof, that will hold at least the minimum 5 people needed to legally marry. This is why many wedding venues have pagodas etc in their grounds, usually open sided so that it’s as outdoors as possible.

Or you can do the legal marriage somewhere else. Then have a fully outdoor blessing, hand-fasting, or celebrant led ceremony.

However, I’m a wedding cake maker. And so my focus is going to be on the cakes with these kinds of weddings.

 

Can you even have a cake at an outdoor wedding?

white fondant wedding cake
A wedding cake outdoors needs some though

Unless there is an extreme heatwave, then yes you can, with a few considerations.

Now I’m not going to say that you can’t have a certain kind of wedding cake if you are having an outdoor wedding. It’s your wedding, you can have exactly the cake you want! But there are types of wedding cakes that will work better than others.

 

Firstly I would avoid the fully naked wedding cakes.

 

These are the ones with no icing or buttercream at all on the outside, just the bare cake on show. This type of wedding cake dries out quit fast at the best of times, put it outside and it will dry out even faster. And no one wants a dry cake.

Semi naked wedding cakes will cope a little better, but not if it’s hot. Buttercream, of any type, wants to melt. It’s why I won’t set a cake up by a heater or open fire etc. Or directly in front of a window getting full sun. you’ll have a sticky mess in no time.

Plus it’s only buttercream on the outside, and buttercream can get sticky. If you’re wedding cake is set up outside then there will be dust, pollen, grass or even sand floating around. If this sticks to the buttercream, then you’re going to be eating more that just the cake.

 

buttercream cake outside
Buttercream cakes outdoors should be kept cool and protected

Your best option is a fondant covered cake for an outdoor wedding.

 

Think of the fondant (sugar paste) as armour. It will be protecting the cake inside from the elements, and anything floating in the air. Once the cake is cut the fondant can be pulled off, and the cake inside will be perfectly okay. Of course you can eat the fondant too.

 

This is not to say you can set a fondant wedding cake up just anywhere outside.

 

The ground needs to be level. If it’s not, then the cake will look wonky. And you may have stability issues too. If the cake table is standing on uneven ground, then it’s going to be unstable too. The same goes for log slice cake stands. You’ve seen me mention them before. Make sure they are properly prepared and level or you’ll have a wonky looking cake.

The cake needs to be set up in the shade. Even with a fondant cake it will still need to be in the coolest place you can find. Fondant is sugar, and sugar doesn’t like heat. I always keep all wedding cakes as cool as I can before delivery, and will often travel with ice blocks in the car with them. Once it starts to warm up though, the cake will start to soften, the fillings will start to soften, and we need to avoid that for as long as possible. Even though the cakes will have their supporting dowels, this won’t guarantee that nothing will move if the cake gets too hot.

fondant wedding cake
Bring the wedding cake out at the last minute if possible

 

THINK WASPS!!!

 

I hate wasps, and it’s mutual (is there actually any point to a wasp??).

A wasp sting will knock me off my feet for a good 24 hours. And wasps LOVE sweet things. Therefore they are going to love your wedding cake! I have seen a whole swarm of wasps on a cake before (not one of mine, but online) and it wasn’t nice. You certainly won’t be able, or want, to eat it after they have finished with it.

Again, a fondant covered cake will offer some protection. They will only be touching/attacking the outer covering, and not the cake itself. So if the worst happens you can pull the fondant off and the cake beneath will be fine.

It’s the same with flies.

Okay I know I sound like I’m raining on your parade, sorry about that. That’s not my intention. I want you parade to be as glorious as possible!

 

If you want to have the wedding cake outdoors, then I would recommend having it brought out just before you want to cut it. This way it is not out for too long. Discuss this with your cake maker, and make sure you have someone on hand to carry the cake out at the appropriate time who knows what they are doing.

The other option would be to have the cake table set up under semi cover. Which brings me to my next point.

 

black wedding cake
Having an easily movable cake table is a good idea

 

It might rain.

 

Yep, it’s the UK. Rain is highly likely let’s face it. So having the cake set up outside will mean someone has got to try and quickly get a heavy wedding cake under cover, without dropping or damaging it! I certainly wouldn’t want to do that!

Some kind of semi cover is a good compromise. Maybe a small, open sided marquee or gazebo. Or if the venue has a summerhouse or covered patio, that would work well. Even under a large tree. Plus, there will be somewhere for everyone to shelter should the great British weather do its thing.

 

Wedding cake under a tree
Under trees can work too

 

 

Here are my top tips for having a wedding cake outdoors.

 

1/ Have the cake in the coolest, and shadiest place you can find. In semi cover is best.

2/ Make sure the ground is level before setting the cake table up.

3/ Be aware of wasps, flies and general air borne dust and dirt.

4/ Have a fondant covered cake to help protect the actual cake underneath.

5/ If the venue has a room that looks out over the site of the wedding, where the cake can be set up, but everyone can still see it, that’s the best option of all.

If you wan to get in touch to discuss all you wedding cake options further, click HERE

Or to receive my FREE guide to choosing your wedding cake, click HERE 

Luxury Wedding Cakes- Does Wedding Cake Size Matter?

Does size matter?

Now stop giggling at the back! I’m talking about your wedding cake size!.
In my last post I talked about the things that seem to stress couples out when it comes to the cake. Making sure you order the right size of cake seems to be one of the biggest worries. Understandably so, I mean you don’t want to seem mean, but don’t want wasted cake either. And the chances are you’ve not ordered a wedding cake before to know about serving sizes and cutting guides.
This isn’t anything to worry about though. Your cake maker knows the drill, and we know how to work out what is the best size cake for the size of wedding. Really all you need to do is give us the number of guests you want the cake to serve.

sizing chart
The sizing chart I work from

Which brings me to another issue.

When to serve the wedding cake?

Traditionally the cake was cut and served after the speeches, at the end of the main wedding breakfast. If there was any left, then it would be offered to evening guests as part of the buffet.
These days though many couples want to wait to cut the cake in the evening. Personally I like this idea, as it is a big part of the day, and something the evening guests would usually miss out on. Cutting the cake in the evening includes all your guests in that special moment. However, cutting and serving in the evening will mean you need a bigger cake for the extra numbers. And what if you want to serve the cake as dessert? AHHHHH!
Okay let’s breathe. It’s only cake (did I really just say that??).
One option to solve the issue of the evening guests missing out on seeing the cake is to do the cake cutting photos after the speeches, but don’t have the cake taken away and cut. Instead leave it until all the evening guests have arrived and seen it. Then give the venue the nod to take it off and cut and serve. You could even do the cake cutting again for the evening guests, why not?
Basically what I’m saying is to forget the traditions surrounding when you should cut and serve the wedding cake. Do it as and when it feels right for you.

cutting the cake with a sward!
You can use a knife!
traditional cake cutting
See, you don’t have to use a sward.
the cake cutting is a special moment
I will always love this cake cutting pic!

Myth Busting.

Now I think we should quickly bust the myth that serving the wedding cake as the dessert will lower costs. Realistically this often isn’t the case. When we work out the size of cake you will need for you 100 guests (number just to illustrate) we will be basing that on the industry standard of a 2x1in portion. In other words a finger size portion you might serve with the after dinner coffee, or as part of a buffet. If you want to serve as dessert you’re going to want much larger portions, maybe even twice that size, but at least 2x2in. And you will also need enough cake for every guest, rather than the usual rule of thumb that 10% won’t eat any. This is going to mean a much larger cake to accommodate the larger portions, and numbers, and make sure there’s enough. Obviously this also means the cost of the cake is going to rise quite considerably. Plus the venue, or caterer, might charge you for serving someone else’s food, as they will be using their cutlery and crockery to serve the cake, and then wash all that up after, plus the service time. Add all that up and it’s not necessarily going to save you any money. But it will mean that all the cake will get eaten, and you won’t have to worry about wastage.

cake cutting guide
Cake cutting guide

Back to size, as this is what this post is mainly about.

When I talk to couples at wedding shows they often think they can’t book the cake because they aren’t sure yet exactly how big it needs to be. This is another myth. And it can often mean you missing out on getting your preferred cake maker because you’ve waited until all the RSVPs have come back before getting in touch. A rough idea on size is all we need at the very start. And if you’ve booked your venue then you already know the kind of size your wedding will be. That’s enough for me to give you a starting quote to base the booking fee on (I work on a 25% booking fee) Then we can up or down scale the cake size later if you find you need to. A good rule of thumb is to take the number of guests on your list and reduce it by 10% when booking the cake, as mentioned before. Although it will need to be for 100% of your guests if serving for dessert.

The Showstopper.

But size isn’t just about the numbers, it’s also about the look. And adding the WOW factor.
The cake is, without doubt, one of the stars, a showstopper. And often the most photographed thing after the couple, and the dress. So you may want something big and impressive, even if it’s only going to be a small wedding. How to do this without having lots of wasted cake? Firstly will it be wasted? The tradition of keeping a tier of the wedding cake for a christening is starting to come back. Or maybe for your first wedding anniversary? You can do this with fruit cake of course, but also with sponge. Sponge cake freezes really well, you’ll just need to give the fondant (if using) time to dry out as it will go sticky as it thaws. You cake maker will advise you on the best ways to store your leftover cake. Then there is the other tradition of posting cake to people who couldn’t make it to the wedding, something else you may wish to do if you have cake left. If none of these are options, then there are dummy cakes. Dummy cakes are used for display cakes for shows and photo shoots etc, but they can also be used to add height and size to a real cake. Now they are usually polystyrene, however I will happily take them back and reuse them in my display work. I reuse my dummy cakes over and over, I can’t remember the last time I bought any!

This showstopper only had three real tiers of cake.

The opposite can also be an issue.

You have a lot of guests to feed, but want an understated wedding, so don’t want a huge cake. Again there is a solution. Cutting cakes. A cutting cake is a simplified version of the actual wedding cake. Usually a square or A4 size cake in the same flavours and with a covering of the chosen icing, but without all the decoration as they won’t be on show. These are kept in the kitchens and cut up by your venue when they take the wedding cake away to cut, then it’s all served together. No one will know which is wedding cake and which is cutting cake.

Top Tips.

So my top tips for getting the wedding cake size right;
1/ Don’t wait until you have all your RSVPs back before booking your cake. Rough numbers are all we need to get the ball rolling.
2/ Decide if you want to serve the cake as dessert or as part of the buffet/with coffee. This will make a difference to the size of cake you need. Just let your cake maker know.
3/ Don’t worry about leftover cake. Sponge cake freezes well, and fruit cake keeps for months.
4/ You can have a showstopping cake even if you don’t need one. Again just discuss this with your cake maker.
5/ You can have cutting cakes for the venue to serve should you want something simpler and smaller, but have lots of guest to feed. This works especially well for large evening receptions after a smaller wedding.

To get in touch about your wedding cake, click HERE

As seen in Hello! One of our wedding cakes!

A few weeks ago I had the pleasure of making the wedding cake for the lovely Jade Parfitt and her fiancé Jack. When I got the phone call there was no indication that this was going to be a celebrity wedding. Jade called me herself, like any other bride, and we chatted about what she wanted and how I could help. At the end of the conversation she mentioned that the wedding might be featured in Hello! Magazine.

 

Hello Magazine logo

 

Now one myth that needs busting about the wedding industry is that we add a 0 when the word ‘wedding’ is mentioned. And this will be several 0’s if it’s a celebrity wedding. WRONG!! Very wrong. This is something a professional wedding supplier would never do. I mean why would we? We don’t want that reputation for a start. I quoted for this wedding in exactly the same way as any other. All weddings are special, and all require our best work. As I say on my website, I quote on the work involved in each cake, not the occasion.

But back to the lovely Jade and Jack.

The wedding was at Ash Barton Estate near Braunton, North Devon. This is a comparatively new venue, but a popular one. You rent the whole place and organise everything yourselves. So it’s idea if you want a more laid-back wedding. And you can stay there too, the kitchen was amazing!

 

Jade and friends
Jade with Erin O’Connor and Jodie Kidd

 

Usually when I deliver a wedding cake I’m one of the only people at the venue, as it’ll be before much is happening. Sometimes the florist or stylist will be there too, and we get on with doing our thing and leave. But this time the wedding was already in full swing! A tad discombobulating! Especially as I’d not delivered there before (although I’ve been back since, and have more booked in there too.)

I pulled up alongside a huge Rolls Royce, and I mean huge. I was amazed the driver had managed to get such a big car along the country lanes, I sometimes struggle in Molly the Mokka. We appeared to be the only cars there. But it turned out that this was because everyone else had parked around the back of the house.

 

the wedding cake
The wedding cake with edible flowers

 

It was one of the most delightful wedding cake deliveries I’ve done. Laid-back, relaxed, and very glamorous all at the same time. The lovely wedding co-ordinator showed me where to set up, gave me the giraffes (yes, you read that right) and left me to it. Jade had given me her brief, but had then allowed me to be creative. So I ordered some edible flowers from Maddox Farm, (they are the best place I know for edible flowers) and added a few from STHQ’s own garden.

Okay, the Giraffes. Yes you did read giraffes. As a super model, Jade is rather tall. And so is Jack! So there is a family joke about giraffes, and they collect them. The ones left for me were their own, and this helped to make the cake even more special and personal. I love it when couples want to add something like this to their cake, or to the wedding in general. And this was a very stylish, cute and fun way to do it. Especially as Jade had glued a little veil to the bride giraffe!

 

Hello! Full page spread
The giraffes! And the full page spread in Hello!

 

Get the look.

If you want to recreate Jade and Jacks wedding cake style, then the first thing I would say is get in touch with me! But if not, then ask your cake maker about the semi-naked style of cakes. They are the perfect blank canvas to add anything you want to.

Edible flowers are huge in weddings and wedding cakes right now, and you can grow them yourself if you have the space and time. However I would recommend ordering from Maddox Farm, they deliver by post, or from a flower farm local to you. Just make sure that the flowers are grown organically, as they will be going directly onto the cake.

Bespoke cake toppers are perhaps the easiest way to personalise your wedding cake. And you can get a great selection online. They can also be made in sugar of you ask your cake maker and give them enough time. Another option is to have figures made in a polymer clay that can then be kept forever. Or you can do as Jade and Jack did, and use something you already have that has real meaning to you.

Luxury Wedding Cakes: FAQs

Welcome back 😊
Today I thought I would answer a few FAQs that seem to come up. I’m always aware that I may work in the wedding industry, and deal with wedding cakes daily, but for you it’s likely going to be a one off, and something you’ve not done before.
So here are my most frequently asked questions.

When should I order the wedding cake? I get asked this at every wedding fair I do. And my answer is always the same; as soon as possible! Sadly there is still a belief out there that the cake can be left to last, and that three to four months is a long enough lead time, but it’s really not!! It’s May 2019 and I’ve already got bookings for September and October 2020. Yet I’m still being asked about wedding cakes for August this year, which has been booked up for months. I hate having to say no, but when I’m booked then I’m booked. So when you have found the person you want to make your wedding cake, then get that booking fee paid to secure your date, even if you haven’t decided 100% on exactly what you want.

How big should the cake be? The simple answer to this is; as big as you want. If you want a huge wedding cake, then have one! But most couples want a cake to feed the number of guests they are having. And it’s perfectly reasonable for you not to know how much cake you’ll need. This is something we can work out for you, if you tell us how many guests the cake will be for, and how you want to serve it. I have a sizing chart that I work from, which gives me portion sizes, and how many portions each size cake will provide. So tell us numbers, and if you’re serving as buffet/with coffee or as desert, we will then work out what size cake will be best. Size will affect cost to a certain extent, so it is something we need to know in order to quote you accurately.

Why do wedding cakes cost so much?! Oh if I had a pound every time the cost of a cake is questioned. I understand that if you’ve never ordered a bespoke cake before, then you won’t know how much work and time goes into them. And this is why they cost what they do. I used to get offended whenever people made rude comments about my prices. But now I just accept that it will happen from time to time. Think about it though. If you are going to get a new bookshelf you can go and get a flat pack, factory made one from a DIY store, or you can get one designed and made for you. You wouldn’t go to the bespoke craftsman, who is going to make your bookshelf to fit exactly, and be designed just for you, and expect them to do it for the cost of the flat pack would you? You would know that getting something crafted just for you, to all your spec, and delivered and set up for you, will cost more than going to Ikea. So why is it any different with cakes? Basically it’s not. There are hours, and even days of work involved in a wedding cake. Sometimes weeks if there is a lot of sugar flowers etc. And it’s skilled work. There is a myth that we add a premium on as soon as we know it’s a wedding. NOT TRUE! And no true professional will. We work out our prices based on the time, skill, materials involved in producing your cake, and then the delivery time needed. So what you are paying for is not just flour, eggs, sugar and butter. You are paying for skill and hours of time.

Can I change my mind about what I want? Within reason, yes. There will reach a point where it won’t be possible to change your order, because ingredients and materials will need to be purchased, and some of the sugar work will have started. Your cake maker will tell you their policy on this. For me it’s around a month before the wedding or event. Remember that changing the design or size of the cake will mean the cost can also change, down as well as up depending on what your changes are.

How long will the cakes last? Probably longer than you think. Of course fruit cake can literally last for years. But sponge cakes will last up to a week as long as they are kept wrapped up. One of the reasons large cakes are covered in icing is to preserve the cake. Originally this icing would have been royal icing, which sets so rock hard you really wouldn’t want to eat it, instead it was there to protect and preserve the cake inside. These days it’s usually sugar paste/fondant that is used to cover cakes. This is much more appealing to eat than royal, but still not there primarily to eat. So don’t worry if you don’t like fondant (I don’t like eating it!) as it’s not really there to be eaten, but to protect the cake and to look beautiful. With a fondant covered cake you will find you’ll get a good week before the cake starts to deteriorate as long as it’s not yet cut. Once the cake it cut then you need to cover the cut sides in cling film to stop the air getting to it. Air is really the enemy here. Which is why the fully naked cakes, without even a coat of buttercream, wont last long at all. If you know you are going to want to keep the cake for a few days after the wedding or event, then it’s best to go with a fully iced cake. Buttercream cakes will still keep a good few days though, especially if kept wrapped after cutting. With this in mind, don’t cut the cake and then leave it out. Ask the venue to cut the cake up just before you’re wanting to serve it, as we don’t use preservatives.

Never be afraid to ask questions. We are here not only to make you a beautiful cake, but also to make it stress free. And remember, there is no such thing as a silly question!

Wedding cakes (and weddings) from afar

Hello again!
I’ve been busy moving my studio from our home, to a lovely space in Clovelly. Which is where you’ll now be able to come and see me to talk all things wedding cake! And taste cake too, and drink tea. All with a sea view. Don’t worry, I’m up top.

I know that many of my couples are getting married in Devon or Cornwall, but don’t live down here. We have become a very popular place for destination weddings, and it’s obvious why. With the dramatic coastlines, the romantic moors and the beautiful woods and picture postcard villages (like Clovelly) There are dozens of options for a beautiful wedding. As well as offering your guests the chance to combine your wedding with a sneaky holiday!
So what happens if you are planning your wedding down here but don’t live here? How do you find suppliers? How do you have consultations with those suppliers? Don’t stress!!! It’s really not that difficult. I’m very used to helping distant couples plan their perfect wedding cake.
Firstly, I would always suggest talking to your venue and asking if they have recommended suppliers. Many venues have suppliers that they like to work with and hold details for. Word of mouth is still the best way to get the quality wedding suppliers you’re looking for. And we all know many other people in the wedding industry, so always ask us. Your florist will almost certainly know a hairdresser, who will know a caterer, who will know a DJ etc. And they will also know who has the best reputations and the most skill in their field.
A wedding planner is also a good idea for any kind of destination wedding. A lot of suppliers also work with planners, and so have a large network of contacts. A wedding planner based in the location you’ve chosen to get married in will know all the best local wedding suppliers. They will also have lots of valuable local knowledge, the best places for your guests to stay, the best routes to use (the sat nav can get raging PMT around here!)
With the issues of distance in mind, many suppliers will offer skype or similar options for consultations. And I also offer cake tasting boxes by post, which works really well. I do try hard to make myself available when my couples are visiting and arranging supplier visits, but that’s not always possible.
Another thing that is a good idea is to plan your visits when there are local wedding fairs or shows. This will allow you to meet and talk to lots of suppliers local to where you are getting married, all in one place and in one day. Don’t forget to give us your email address, this way we can get back to you with the information you’re asking for in more detail.
I’ve also gone a step further and secured a London base too 😊 Very exciting!!! I’m delighted to have been accepted as a member of The Wedding Gallery at 1 Marylebone Road. If you’ve never visited, then you need to book an appointment! It’s the most stunning wedding emporium, filled with the best wedding suppliers you can find. As a member I can now meet you there to discuss your wedding cake, and also drink more tea.

So here’s you checklist for finding suppliers when you don’t live in the place you’re getting married.
1/ Don’t stress! There may be logistical issues to bear in mind when planning a destination wedding. But that needn’t mean extra stress.
2/ Ask your wedding venue if they have any suppliers they recommend. This will give you a good starting point, and give you piece of mind.
3/ Consider using a wedding planner who is based in the place you’re getting married. Again, they will have lots of local knowledge and contacts. It will also mean you have someone ‘on the ground’ to troubleshoot for you.
4/ When you’re planning your visits try to time then to coincide with local wedding fairs or shows. And try to give the suppliers you want to visit as much notice as possible.
5/ Pick the brains of all your suppliers. We all have a ‘little black book’ of contacts. And word of mouth is still the best way to find the best suppliers.

Luxury wedding cakes: Myth busting part 1!

There are a lot of myths surrounding wedding cakes, some might have a small foothold in fact. But most are just that, myths.
So today we are going to bust a few of those wedding cake myths. And also explain a few things that can get confusing.
Possibly the myth about wedding cakes that cause us cake makers the most issues is the one that is still, sadly, perpetuated. And that is that the cake can be left until last, and doesn’t need to be ordered until a few weeks before the wedding. NOT TRUE!!!!! I can’t count the amount of couples I’ve had to turn down because they have come to me too late, and their date has already been booked. It’s frustrating for us, and causes extra stress for the couple. I always try to fit in a last minute order. But with wedding cakes, that’s not always possible. So please, please don’t leave the cake until last! Really you should be looking at booking the wedding cake when you are booking the venue and other key elements.
In a similar vein is another wedding cake myth that gives cake makers headaches is that the cake will be one of the cheapest elements, so you don’t need to budget much for it. Again NOT TRUE!! If I had a pound for every time I hear ‘how much??? But it’s only cake!!’ Then I could retire right now!!! The truth is that a wedding cake isn’t ‘just a cake.’ In the same way the wedding dress isn’t ‘just a dress.’ Yes you can get a dress from Primark for a tenner, but do you want that for your wedding dress? In the same way you can get a cake in Asda for a tenner, but for your wedding? And wedding cakes tend to be the biggest cakes most of us ever need, and the most elaborate. Translation, they take a lot of work and time. And many of the elements of a luxury wedding cake will be very skilled work, that will take us many hours. There is no conspiracy to get more money out of you, quite the opposite. Many of us work on tight profit margins, and can often end up taking home less than minimum wage.
Myth three on my list is one I actually used to believe myself until I started making cakes professionally, and learned the reality. This is that you can’t stack fruit cake on top of sponge, and so the fruit cake needs to be the bottom tier, or be separate. The truth is that, as long as the cakes are doweled properly, and supported, then you can stack a fruit cake on top of sponge.
Yes fruit cakes are heavier and denser than a sponge cake. And I think this is where the myth arose, and I can see why. If you’re not used to stacking cakes, then the thought of putting a heavy fruit cake on top of a fluffy sponge seems counter intuitive. But, with the right supports in place, it can be done. So don’t worry if you want fruit cake at your wedding, but only really want or need a small amount. It’s completely possible ?
Next on the list is ‘no one ever eats the wedding cake anyway.’ Well this might have been true back in the day, when wedding cakes were tires of heavy fruit cake, thick marzipan (yuck!) and rock hard royal icing. By the time everyone has eaten a big meal, and had a good drink or three, then the idea of a dense, and often very boozy, cake may not have been very appealing. However, we now have yummy sponges!!! I mean who doesn’t love cake?! You’ll be surprised that most people who claimed they’re full, will find room for a decadent cake with an indulgent filling. I usually recommend ordering enough cake for 80-90% of your guests. And don’t forget the kids! Kids love to feel grown up. And having their own slice of wedding cake will do just that.
There are more myths out there to bust!!! But I think I’ve gone on enough this time. So watch this space for the rest!

It’s time to get naked!!!!! (wedding cakes)

Okay not us, well not me anyway, but the cake.
Naked and Semi-naked wedding cakes have boomed in popularity in recent years, and they ae still going strong. But there are a few things you need to think about with them, especially the fully naked cakes.
I touch on this in my Ts&Cs because there can be issues with fully naked cakes.
Now I’m not trying to put you off getting naked on your wedding day ? heaven forbid!! And I’m not trying to put you off having a naked cake, the are very cute.
However, they can also dry out rather quickly, especially on hot summer days. Yes, even in the UK! So this needs to be kept in mind when thinking of going naked. How long will you want the cake to sit out on display before cutting and eating? A couple of hours? Then you’re fine. All day and into the evening? Hmmmm….. might want to think about giving your wedding cake some underwear.
And this is where the semi-naked cake is perfect. It’s giving your naked cake a thin skim of buttercream on the outside, the cake still shows through, but there’s enough cover to give some protection. It also looks super pretty, and the buttercream can be tinted a variety of colours. It also means you can have any combination of cake flavours, and the cakes won’t look mismatched. So you can have Vanilla, Red Velvet and Chocolate all together for example.
There is also a third option. And that is to have a full coating of buttercream. This is perfect for anyone who really dislikes fondant (sugar paste) but doesn’t want the rustic look of the semi-naked. Buttercream is surprisingly versatile too. You can tint it different colours as I’ve already mentioned. You can airbrush it to make it shimmer, you can texture it in dozens of ways, or you can have it glass smooth.
A good buttercream will form a ‘crust’ once dry, and this is a good thing. This is what will protect your cake from drying out. A buttercream cake can also be refrigerated. Fondant cakes can be too, but they will need to be out of the fridge a good hour before they are needed, as condensation can form on the fondant as it comes back to room temperature. This is perfectly normal, and nothing to worry about, but will be sticky if your try to move it before it’s dried.
So a few quick pointers:
Naked cakes are best kept covered for as long as possible, and left out for as short a time as possible.
Semi-naked cakes are fine left out on display as long as needed, but not by a heater or direct sunlight (this applies to any cake anyway.)
Buttercream cakes are a great alternative to fondant.
All can happily be kept in the fridge without issue.